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Sicily has more vineyards than any other region in Italy, but the vast majority are planted for the production of  Marsala. However, in the last few years, Sicilian winemaking has progressed, so there are now not only excellent major Sicilian producers but many more smaller-scale high-quality producers, many using Sicily's indigenous grapes. For a thorough look at Sicilian wines try Robery Camuto's "A Sicilian Wine Odyssey'" 2010

Reds

Frappato di Vittoria: a light refreshing wine, with a full bouquet. Usually produced in its pure form but sometimes blended to make the very popular Cerasuolo di Vittoria.

Nero d'avola: Sicily's major red wine grape. Can be 100% varietal or combined with cabernet or merlot. At its best it has lots of dark fruit aromas, smooth and peppery, and is frequently compared with Syrah.

Nerello Mascalese: more robust than its cousin Nero d'avola. Earthy and ripe, but with excellent brightness for balance, it is in the Mourvedre class.

Marsala

This is the true wine of Sicily. Not the volume-related cooking variety, but true Marsala. One of the great fortified wines of the world, like port or sherry. Marsala can be gold, amber or ruby, depending on the grapes that are used. Marsala is further defined as Fine, aged one year and typically used for cooking; Superiore, aged two to four years; and Vergine/Solaris, with aging in wood from five to ten years. The first two varieties can come either as secco (dry) or semisecco (medium-dry) or dolce (sweet).

 

 

 

 

whites

Catarratto: a robust white with great flavors, primarily from the western regions.

Chardonnay: this is the grape of the future in white wines from Sicily. The climate allows for intense flavorful explosive fruity chardonnays to be made, much in the style of California.

Corvo's Columbia Platino, from the inzolia or ansonica grape. A good vino da tavola.

Grecanico Bianco: soft and harmonious, with a strong bouquet. often used to blend with other whites.

Grillo: crisp and light, mith moderate acidity and notable sweetness. A table wine of good quality.

note: whites using the native Sicilian grapes: Inzolia and Grillo, are now being cited as excellent --  better than just vino da tavola.

 

 

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